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Wedco is a Tobacco-Free Campus

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Wedco District Health Department became a Tobacco-Free Campus on July 1, 2010. We appreciate your continued support of this effort by refraining from using tobacco products while visiting our facilities.

Employee Events

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Wedco District Health Department participates in several community and employee events each year. These events are an excellent time to serve our communities and get to know our employees. Click the title above to view some photos from these events.

Quit Now Kentucky

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Quit Now Kentucky is a FREE online service available to Kentucky residents 15 years of age and over. Our expert coaches can talk to you about overcoming common barriers, such as dealing with stress, fighting cravings, coping with irritability, and controlling weight gain. We also offer a free telephone service, so you can speak to a coach in person, if you would prefer. Click the title above to launch the website.

Like Us on Facebook!

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Wedco District Health Department is now on Facebook! Like us to learn more about upcoming events and programs, as well as to get updates on various health topics. Click the title above to launch Facebook.

Kentucky Department for Public Health

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The mission of the Kentucky Department for Public Health (KDPH) is to improve the health and safety of people in Kentucky through Prevention, Promotion and Protection. Click the title above to be redirected to the KDPH website.

kynect: Kentucky's Healthcare Connection

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Quality health coverage. For every Kentuckian. One-stop shopping to find the health insurance you need for yourself, your family, and your business. 1-855-4kynect (459-6328) Click the title above to launch the kynect website.

Let's Make the Next Generation Tobacco-Free

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Let’s Make the Next Generation Tobacco-Free: Your Guide to the 50th Anniversary Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health. A short, easy-to-read booklet that summarizes historical information on changes in smoking norms since the release of the first Surgeon General's Report in January 1964, new findings on causes, and solutions. Click the title above to view the Consumer Guide.

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Be Sweet to Your Feet if You Have Diabetes

By the National Diabetes Education Program

Taking care of your feet is very important for people with diabetes. Good foot care helps reduce your risk for serious foot problems that can lead to amputations. To decrease your risk of foot problems, learn to manage the ABCs of diabetes. This means keeping your blood glucose (as measured by the A1C test), blood pressure, and cholesterol in the target range recommended by your health care provider. Ask your health care provider about your diabetes ABCs and how to do a foot exam at home.

Be sweet to your feet by following these foot care tips:

·          Check your feet every day (evening is best) for cuts, blisters, red spots, swelling, and sore toenails. If you have trouble bending over to see your feet, use a plastic mirror or ask a family member or caregiver to help.

 ·          Wash your feet every day in warm water, and be sure to dry well between the toes.

 ·          Rub a thin coat of skin lotion on the tops and bottoms of your feet, but not between your toes.

 ·          Trim your toenails carefully and straight across when needed. See your podiatrist if you need help.

 ·          Never walk barefoot, and wear comfortable shoes that fit well and protect your feet. Nerve damage can cause loss of feeling. Look and feel inside your shoes before putting them on. Ask your team about getting special shoes.

 ·          Keep the blood flowing to your feet by wiggling your toes and moving your ankles up and down for 5 minutes, two or three times a day.

 ·          Plan a physical activity program with your health care team.

 ·          Take your shoes and socks off at every check up and have your doctor look at your feet. Tell your health care team right away about any foot problems.

 ·          Let your doctor know right away if you have loss of feeling in your feet, changes in the shape of your foot or foot ulcers or sores that do not heal.

 

For a free copy of Take Care of Your Feet for a Lifetime, contact the National Diabetes Education Program at www.YourDiabetesInfo.org or call 1-888-693-NDEP (1-888-693-6337), TTY: 1-866-569-1162.

 

Do You Want to Be Smoke-Free in 2014?

It's New Year's Resolution time and if you are interested in becoming Smoke-Free in 2014, then we have the classes for you!  Smoking cessation classes will start in January for Harrison County, February for Scott County, and April for Nicholas County.  See the flyers below!

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E-cigs and Increased Calls to Poison Centers

What is the status of these calls to the KY Poison Center?

 

(From Ashley Webb, KRPC)  In 2013, at the Kentucky Regional Poison Control Center we saw an increase in calls concerning e-cigarettes that was six times higher than the number of calls in 2012, and already this year, we will exceed that total number in 2013 by the end of March. 

 

With any new product, we expect to an increase in the number of calls to poison control centers.   However, we are more concerned when the product involved has such a high potential for causing injury.  During the same time period in 2013, we did not see a change in the number calls concerning exposures to other tobacco products, and those calls we did see were more than 90% children under the age of 6 with nausea and vomiting being the most significant symptoms in nearly all cases. 

 

When it comes to concentrated liquid nicotine, 40% of the exposures we see are adults using the products and in this case, with adults and children, the danger is not just ingestion, but with simple contact with the skin.  A majority of our callers were not aware of the potential toxicity of these products. 

 

Even with child-resistant caps, this would only slow a child down, not prevent an exposure.  We want to increase awareness around the potential toxicity of these products and emphasize that these concentrated products are significantly toxic in very small doses. 

 

Adults should use care to protect their skin when handling the products, they should be out of sight and out of reach of children, and those using the product should dispose of it properly to prevent exposure to pets and children from the residue or liquid left in the container.

 

Ashley was quoted in a story featured in today's Washington Post:

 

 http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/calls-to-poison-centers-about-e-cigarettes-have-surged/2014/04/03/f2751a3e-bb3a-11e3-96ae-f2c36d2b1245_story.html

 

 

 

 

Take Care of Your Diabetes to Keep Your Kidneys Healthy
By the National Diabetes Education Program

If you have diabetes, it’s important that you know about the link between diabetes and kidney disease, and what you can do to keep your kidneys healthy.

Why do we have kidneys?

You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist, located just below the rib cage, near your back. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of your blood to make urine. Your kidneys also help control blood pressure.

What is kidney disease?

Your kidneys filter your blood through many tiny blood vessels within your kidney. If the blood vessels in your kidney are damaged, they become less and less able to do their job. This damage can cause wastes to build up in your body. This is called kidney disease.

What is the link between diabetes and kidney disease?

Kidney disease is most often caused by diabetes or high blood pressure (which many people with diabetes also have). As many as 2 in 3 people with diabetes also have high blood pressure. About 1 in 3 people with diabetes have kidney disease.

When you have uncontrolled diabetes, there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood. This high blood sugar can damage the tiny blood vessels in your kidneys, so they have trouble filtering waste from your blood. High blood pressure also can damage these blood vessels.

Having diabetes does not mean you will get kidney disease. The better a person with diabetes keeps their blood sugar and blood pressure under control, the lower the chance of getting kidney disease. 

Kidney disease usually develops over many years, and has few warning signs in the early stages; so many people with kidney disease don’t know they have it. That’s why it’s important to manage your diabetes and your blood pressure at all times.

Can kidney disease be treated?

Yes. If you have kidney disease, you can stop it from getting worse by taking care of your diabetes and taking any needed medicines.

People with diabetes can lower their chances of having diabetes-related health problems like kidney disease by managing the ABCs of diabetes – A1C, Blood Pressure, and Cholesterol.

·         A is for the A1C test. It measures your average blood sugar level over the past three months.

·         B is for blood pressure. High blood pressure makes your heart work too hard.

·         C is for cholesterol. Bad cholesterol, or LDL, builds up and clogs your arteries.

Ask your health care team what your A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol numbers are; what your ABC numbers should be; and what you can do to reach your ABC goals.

Here are other things you can do to keep your kidneys healthy when you have diabetes:

·         Get your blood and urine tested at least once a year to measure how well your kidneys are working.

·         Be physically active.

·         If you smoke, get help to quit.

·         Follow what your doctor says. Your doctor may ask you to see a special doctor to help with your kidney disease. Your doctor may also tell you to eat less salt.

·         Take all medicines that your doctor tells you to take – even when you feel well.

Spread the word about the link between diabetes and kidney disease. There are many things you can do to take care of your kidneys and your overall health when you have diabetes.

To learn more about kidney disease, read About Kidney Disease from the National Kidney Disease Education Program.

For more about managing your diabetes, read 4 Steps to Manage Your Diabetes for Life, from the National Diabetes Education Program. You can also visit www.YourDiabetesInfo.org/MakeAPlan or call 1-888-693-NDEP (1-888-693-6337); TTY: 1-866-569-1162.   

 

 
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